Programme Details

QQI Programme Details 2015 

Programme Name: CERTIFICATE IN COMMUNITY STUDIES (Part time):
NFQ Level: 6
Type: Special Purpose 

Code:  CCS1/6N14293
Stage: 1

Module Objectives

  • Provide learners with a broad understanding of the theories and concepts that shape and influence modern societies.
  • Enable learners to define and explain characteristics of the social world from a sociological perspective.
  • Introduce key theories that have formed specific ways of viewing the world and social relations.
  • Provide a sociological basis for broadening interpretation of events and social relations

Module Outcomes

On completion learners should be able to:

  • Describe the origins of sociology and the sociological field of study
  • Identify and define key theoretical perspectives (paradigms).
  • Describe the key theories of Marx, Durkheim and Weber.
  • Explain key concepts which shape modern societies (such as social structures and institutions)
  • Outline the relevance and influence of race, ethnicity and gender on social relations.

Module Curriculum

  • History and Origins of the social sciences and sociology 10%

What is sociology and how did it evolve as a field of study
Key theoretical perspectives and sociological paradigms

  • Early sociological thinkers and key theories 20%

Changing society and early theorists Tonnies, Spencer
Theories of Marx, Durkheim and Weber

  • Role of research in social theory 10%

Doing social research and the transformation of research practice
Review of key studies and how they were conducted

  • Society, social institutions and social structures 20%

Difference between social structures and social institutions
Nature and functions of social institutions
Explanation of social structures
Inter-relationship between social institutions and structures

  • Socialization and core concepts in sociology 20%

How socialization works
Social stratification and class
Social control and deviance

  • Social construction of groups 20%

Gender analysis: feminism, masculinities, etc.
Race and ethnicity

Code:  CCS1/6N14295
Stage: 1

Module Objectives

  • Model a style of facilitation that is grounded in theories of participation and experiential learning, and that can be applied in a housing, community or social care setting.
  • Introduce learners to theories on group work and group dynamics
  • Demonstrate the cycle of working with groups that includes planning, implementation, evaluation and feed-back.
  • Initiate personal reflection through the use of a learning journal.
  • Give learners the opportunity to practice and critically appraise their skills in a supportive environment.

Module outcomes

On completion of this module learners should be able to:

  • Comprehend the process of group work and facilitation.
  • Begin to develop a personal style of facilitation.
  • Facilitate a learning group for a short period of time.
  • Recognise and demonstrate the importance of planning and evaluation for group work.
  • Illustrate the importance of critical reflection on personal practice.

Module Curriculum

  • Beginnings of groups 30%

Questions and anxieties in a group.
Stages of group development
Group roles and group behaviours
Group dynamics – Task-process-relationship theories.

  • Working with groups 40%

The role of the facilitator
Facilitation styles and skills – use of role-play, drama, simulation, participation and experiential learning.
Listening and communicating.
Understanding and practising the planning process.
Designing and implementing a group session.
Evaluation models and methods.

  • Managing conflict and problem solving in a group 15%

Personal approaches to conflict.
Conflict management and negotiation skills – Killmann’s Conflict Mode Instrument.
Factors that affect our conflict mode.

  • Critical writing and reflecting 10%

Concepts of critical thinking.
How to write reflectively.

  • Overview of module 5%

Recap on the contents of the module
Discussion on learning from module completion

Code:  CCS1/6N14294
Stage: 1

Module Objectives

  • Illustrate the complex nature of ‘community’ by introducing learners to related concepts and contestations.
  • Explore the importance of culture and interculturalism when interpreting community.
  • Introduce learners to ‘community development’ including an understanding of underlying theories and purposes of practice.

Module outcomes

On completion of this module learners should be able to:

  • Name the different types of community and be able to identify at least one grouping within each.
  • Identify common beliefs associated with community membership.
  • Discuss common definitions of culture and interculturalism and outline opportunities and challenges facing communities where different cultures co-exist.
  • Recognise common features across definitions of community development and describe the core principles of participation, empowerment, collective action, equality and task/process.
  • Explain differing approaches to community work and community development.
  • Engage in discussions on concepts of community, community membership and community development interventions

Module Curriculum

  • Concepts of community 35%

Types of community – e.g., geography, issue-based, interest-based, identity-based, culture/ethnicity.
Contestations of concepts of community – ‘historical utopianism’, advantage and  disadvantage, exclusion of minorities.
Me and my community – Clarke’s interpretation of the relationship between the   individual and community. Interpretations of structure versus agency (particularly as interpreted   by Marx, Durkheim, Bourdieu, Giddens).

  • Culture and identity 30%

Exploring cultural identity, cultural beliefs and cultural differences – to include Max-  Neef’s Wheel of Fundamental Needs, Bourdieu’s theories on the reproduction of cultural capital.
Interculturalism and multiculturalism – cross cultural communication, accommodation    versus assimilation, human rights, discrimination and prejudice. 

  • Definitions and Principles of Community Development 30%

Understanding core principles as they apply to community development,
Participation
Empowerment
Collective action
Social justice
Equality & anti-discrimination.

Exploring common definitions of community development (UN, Irish Government, Local    community groups)
Approaches to Community development,
Asset-based community development.
Issue-based community development.Rights-based community development.
Social Entrepreneurialism.

  • Overview of the module 5%

Recap on modular contents.
Discussion on the changing face of community work, community development in Ireland.

Programme Name: BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HOUSING AND COMMUNITY STUDIES (CAO Code RS701):
NFQ Level: 7
Type: Major  

Code:  6N14287
Stage: 1

Module Objectives

The aim of this module is to:

  • Provide learners with a broad understanding of the theories and concepts that shape and influence modern societies.
  • Enable learners to define and explain characteristics of the social world from a sociological perspective.
  • Introduce key theories that have formed specific ways of viewing the world and social relations.

Provide a sociological basis for broadening interpretation of events and social relations.

Learning Outcomes

  • Describe the origins of sociology and the sociological field of study.
  • Identify and define key theoretical perspectives (paradigms).
  • Explain key concepts which shape modern societies (such as social structures and institutions).
  • Outline the relevance and influence of race, ethnicity and gender on social relations.

Module Curriculum

History and Origins of the social sciences and sociology (10%)

  • What is sociology and how did it evolve as a field of study
  • Key theoretical perspectives and sociological paradigms

Early sociological thinkers and key theories (15%)

  • Changing society and early theorists Comte, Tonnies, Spencer
  • Theories of Marx, Durkheim and Weber

Modern/Postmodern social theory (20%)

  • Structural functionalism
  • Symbolic interactionism
  • Contemporary feminist theory
  • Structuralism
  • Post-structuralism

Society, social institutions and social structures (20%)

  • Difference between social structures and social institutions
  • Nature and functions of social institutions
  • Explanation of social structures
  • Inter-relationship between social institutions and structures

Socialization and core concepts in sociology (15%)

  • How socialization works
  • Social stratification and class
  • Social control and deviance

Social construction of groups (20%)

  • Gender analysis: feminism, masculinities, LGBT
  • Race and ethnicity

Code:  104
Stage: 6N14285

Module Objectives

The objectives of this module are to:

  • Illustrate the complex nature of ‘community’ by introducing learners to related concepts and contestations.
  • Explore the importance of culture and interculturalism when interpreting community.
  • Introduce learners to ‘community development’ including an understanding of underlying theories and purposes of practice.

Module outcomes

On completion of this module learners should be able to:

  1. Name the different types of community and be able to identify at least one grouping within each.
  2. Identify common beliefs associated with community membership.
  3. Discuss common definitions of culture and interculturalism and outline opportunities and challenges facing communities where different cultures co-exist.
  4. Recognise common features across definitions of community development and describe the core principles of participation, empowerment, collective action, equality and task/process.
  5. Explain differing approaches to community work and community development.

Module Curriculum

Concepts of community (35%)

  • Types of community – e.g., geography, issue-based, interest-based, identity-based, culture/ethnicity
  • Contestations of concepts of community – ‘historical utopianism’, advantage and disadvantage, exclusion of minorities
  • Me and my community – Clarke’s interpretation of the relationship between the individual and community.  Interpretations of structure versus agency (particularly as interpreted by Marx, Durkheim, Bourdieu, Giddens) 

Culture and identity (30%)

  • Exploring cultural identity, cultural beliefs and cultural differences – to include Max-Neef’s Wheel of Fundamental Needs, Bourdieu’s theories on the reproduction of cultural capital
  • Interculturalism and multiculturalism – cross cultural communication, accommodation versus assimilation, human rights, discrimination and prejudice

Definitions and Principles of Community Development (30%)

Understanding core principles as they apply to community development,

  • Participation
  • Empowerment
  • Collective action
  • Social justice
  • Equality & anti-discrimination.

Exploring common definitions of community development (UN, Irish Government, Local community groups)

Approaches to Community development,

  • Asset-based community development
  • Issue-based community development
  • Rights-based community development
  • Social Entrepreneurialism.

Overview of the module (5%)

  • Recap on modular contents
  • Discussion on the changing face of community work, community development in Ireland

Code:  6N14284
Stage: 1

Module Objectives

The aim of this module is to:

  • Introduce learners to the study of social policy and the concept of the welfare state.
  • Explain the key theories and concepts relating to social policy.
  • Describe the development of the welfare state and different welfare ideologies.
  • Outline the provision of social services at a national and local level in Ireland.
  • Illustrate the connection between housing policy and the wider social policy field.

Module outcomes

  • Describe the main features of Irish social policy and the historical influences on their development.
  • Define the key theories and concepts in social policy.
  • Identify the differences between varying types of welfare systems in different countries.
  • Outline the provision of social services at a national and local level in Ireland.

Module Curriculum

Origins of the Welfare State (10%)

  • Germany, Bismark and the national scheme of social insurance
  • Britain and the Beveridge Report
  • Spicker’s Big 5

Key theories and concepts of social policy (30%)

For Example:

  • Rights and needs
  • Redistribution
  • Universalism
  • Stigma
  • Equality

 Development of Irish social policy and the mixed economy of welfare (30%)

  • History of Irish social policy; Poor Law to Partnership and beyond
  • Welfare provision in the public, private, voluntary and informal sectors

Introduction to welfare typologies (10%)

  • Development of the welfare state
  • Theories of welfare typologies (e.g. Titmus and Esping-Andersen)

 Social service provision in Ireland (20%)

  • Provision of social services in Ireland
  • Role and function of local government

Code:  6N14283
Stage: 1

Module Objectives

The aims of this module are to:

  • Support personal development planning.
  • Introduce the learner to the range of learning styles enabling them to identify and enhance their own default approach.
  • Support the development of effective and confident communication skills.
  • Enhance the development of effective techniques in study, writing, note-taking and referencing.

Module outcomes

On completion of this module, learners should be able to:

  • Understand the principles and practices of academic reading, writing and referencing
  • Evaluate personal traits and objectives (both long term and short term) for study, student life and future employment plans.
  • Identify socio-economic and cultural factors that can influence adult learning.
  • Appreciate the effectiveness of team-working.
  • Acquire communication skills relevant to personal development including an awareness of constructive feed-back.

Module Curriculum

Personal development planning (20%)

  • Giving and receiving feed-back
  • Carrying out a SWAT analysis
  • Kolb’s learning cycle – reflection, action planning, implementation
  • Creative writing & critical journaling
  • Study skills

Principles and practices of academic reading (20%)

  • Critical reading
  • Drafting, editing and proof-reading of documents
  • Referencing
  • Academic reading & IT supports – academic searches, software packages (e.g. OneNote)
  • Legislation relating to data storage and retrieved usage – (e.g. the Data Protection Act, the Freedom of Information Act)

Personal, socio-economic and cultural factors of adult learning (20%)

  • Life-cycle stages
  • Learning theories and learning styles.

Team-working (20%)

  • Types of teams and their functions
  • Advantages and disadvantages of team-working organisationally and individually.
  • Situations where team-working is effective
  • Stages of team development
  • Skills for team-working
  • Team planning
  • Managing conflict in a team
  • Styles of leadership

Communication (20%)

  • Communications theory: sender, receiver, message, code, channel, communicate, noise, context
  • Verbal & non-verbal communication
  • Cross-cultural communication – high context/low context communication methods.
  • Listening: listening for facts/feelings, active listening, understanding and interpretation
  • Effective dialogue, negotiation and decision making

Code: 6N14273
Stage: 1

Module Objectives

The aim of this module is to:

  • Describe the development of housing in Ireland.
  • Introduce learners to housing terminology along with the key features and concepts of housing in Ireland.
  • Explain the three main housing tenures in Ireland and how they operate.
  • Describe how housing policies impact specific groups of people in society, specifically issues of homelessness and homeless policies.
  • Illustrate the relationship between housing law and policy.

Learning Outcomes

  • Describe the development of housing in the Irish Context since the 1800s.
  • Provide an overview of the housing sector in Ireland.
  • Examine the effectiveness of Irish housing policy, and discuss its relationship with housing law
  • Understand the multi-faceted nature of homelessness.

Module Curriculum

Housing in Ireland (since the 1800’s) (15%)

  • History of housing and housing policy

Three Main Housing Tenures (15%)

  • Introduction to the three main tenures
    • Social Rental
    • Private Rental
    • Owner Occupation

The Development of Housing Policy (20%)

  • Development of current housing policy
  • The influence of international housing policies
  • Key concepts in housing policy

Housing Law and Policy (15%)

  • Outline of key legislation in housing and related areas
  • The impact of law on policy and policy development in Ireland
  • Introduction to EU legislation and conventions relating to housing in Ireland

Classification of Housing Need and Housing Policies Affecting Particular Groups (15%)

  • Theory of need – Spicker
  • Housing for particular groups of people including travellers, people with a disability, older persons, and young people leaving care

Homelessness (10%)

  • Defining homelessness nationally and internationally, including how data is collected and presented on homelessness
  • Causes and effects of homelessness
  • Development of homeless policies in Ireland and internationally

Overview of the Curriculum (10%)

  • Recap the contents of this module.
  • Discussion on the future of housing in Ireland

Code: 6N14282
Stage: 2

Module Objectives

The aim of this module is to:

  • Introduce the core principles of micro- and macro-economic theory
  • Consider the role of markets, prices and economic life-cycle theory
  • Examine the role of financial institutions in the provision of housing

Learning Outcomes

  • Define core economic concepts
  • Demonstrate knowledge of microeconomic and macroeconomic theories and their relevance to socio-economics in Ireland
  • Understand how financial institutions and markets operate

Module Curriculum

Introduction to Economics (20%)

  • Historical development of economic theory
  • Principles and concepts of economics
  • Factors of production

Introduction to Microeconomics (40%)

  • Supply, demand and the allocation of limited resources
  • Opportunity costs and elasticity
  • Markets (perfect competition, monopoly and oligopoly)

Introduction to Macroeconomics (40%)

  • Cycle of boom and bust, recession and recovery
  • The role of markets and ‘market failure’
  • Relationship between the market and the State
  • Post Bretton Woods Economic theories, developments and influences
  • Financial Institutions: National and Internationa

Code: 6N14281
Stage: 2

Module Objectives

The aim of this module is to:

  • Place Irish housing finance within a wider economics context.
  • Examine systems and arrangements for financing the housing sector, particularly social housing within Ireland and the OECD region
  • Track the recent changes within Irish housing finance
  • Assess the Irish government’s financial policies for each of the main housing tenures

Learning Outcomes

  • Express housing finance within a wider economics framework
  • Discuss the role of the Irish state and of the agencies within an evolving  housing    finance system
  • Examine and critique Irish housing finance policy across the tenures, placing it within an international context.

Module Curriculum

Concepts of Housing Finance (35%)

  • Introduction to housing finance as production and consumption of housing
  • Historical account of housing finance models within the main housing tenures
  • Contrast value and price
  • Housing finance within the wider economics context
  • The concept of housing market failure
  • Range of perspectives on housing finance: economic, sociological, historical and that of the end-user
  • External factors and recent changes in contemporary finance and their impact on policy and practice

Housing Finance Systems and the State (35%)

  • The role of the state, particularly in relation to fiscal policy and housing finance
  • State ideologies: market / welfare
  • Agencies and their evolving role in the housing finance system (Housing Finance Agency, Local Authorities, banks, NAMA)
  • Legal responsibilities for housing associations, particularly fiduciary responsibility, Company Law, Charity Law, government regulations.
  • Current state intervention in housing finance and financial models

Housing Funding Practice (30%)

  • Methods of funding including CAS and CLSS 
  • Current methods of housing funding for example CALF, long term leasing, RAS
  • Budgeting, rent setting principles, accounting and auditing, planning and maintenance
  • Models of reporting and accountability

Code: 6N14279
Stage: 2

Module objectives

The objectives of this module are to:

  • Develop an understanding of the relationship between good quality housing design and specific context and policy.
  • Recognise housing design as a component focus for creating better built environments.
  • Develop an understanding of the influence of micro and macro level design considerations and their impact for the end user.
  • Provide an overview of the building regulations and their impact on the design process

Module outcomes

On completion of this module learners should be able to:

  • Provide an overview of design policy in Ireland and internationally.
  • Identify the impact of design policy on the built environment and communities.
  • Describe the significance of good quality housing design and understand the importance of the client brief and client interaction within the procurement process.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of building legislation and its impact on design of housing.

Module Curriculum

  • Evolution of Design: 15%
  • Town Planning 15%
  • Master Planning 15%
  • Design in Practice 15%
  • Health & Safety 10%
  • Design Policy; Strategies & Regulations 15%
  • Client Brief & Stakeholder Involvement 15%

Code: 6N14278
Stage: 2

Module objectives

The aim of this module is to:

  • Equip learners to examine and learn from the historical development of management theory and practice, relating it to the modern international global context.
  • Cultivate an understanding of the dimensions of the management process in the professional management of a variety of organisational contexts in both the Public (not for profit) and Private sectors.
  • Understand and appreciate current management theory and practice and to develop awareness of key managerial abilities and skills
  • Develop an awareness of the issues and challenges of managing modern organisations.

Module outcomes

  • Display knowledge of current management theories, concepts, challenges and opportunities.
  • Exhibit an understanding of managerial skills, initiative and insight in organisational contexts.
  • Demonstrate ability to select and apply appropriate management theory and practice in any organisational context.
  • Work effectively in teams while developing interpersonal skills.

Module Curriculum

  • Evolution of Management Thought (10%)

Evolution of management theory and practice;  behavioural theories. Defining management (art or science?), functions and roles of management, essential managerial skills

  • The Management Environment (10%)

The organisational environment. Ethical and corporate social responsibility issues.

  • Planning & Decision Making (15%)

The nature and purpose of planning.   The planning process.  Planning and performance.  Management By Objectives (MBO). Decision-making processes.   Group decision-making

  • Organisation  (15%)

Organisation principles and structures. Formal and informal organisation.Committees. Organisation design Organisational culture

  • Human Resource Management (HRM) (10%)

The purpose and scope of HRM policy. HRM process.

  • Leadership & Motivation     (15%)

Major theories of motivation, modern approaches.  Major theories of leadership.  Developing interpersonal skills. Conflict management;

  • Communications (10%)

The need for communications, communication process, methods and networks, barriers to communications, improving communications and information requirements

  • Control (15%)

The nature and purpose of control. Strategies for control.  Characteristics of an effective control system, ethics and control. Behavioural aspects of control systems

Code: 6N14277
Stage: 2

Module objectives

The aims of this module are to:

  • Uncover a history of community development both in Ireland and internationally.
  • Introduce learners to the presence of the Community and Voluntary Sector; positioning this within wider civil society.
  • Offer a terminology associated with concepts of community, particularly theories of social capital and communitarianism.
  • Enable learners to explore dimensions of power especially through the relationship between community groups and the State.

Module outcomes

On completion of this module, learners should be able to:

  • Identify a history of community development and position it within wider developmental models.
  • Critique differing theories of community development.
  • Explain concepts of power and critically assess participatory democracy as a model of power sharing.
  • Examine interplays between community groups and the State with reference to relevant policy documentation.

Module Curriculum

History of community development (25%)

  • A history through models of overseas development, the role of the UN.
  • Community Development’s origins through Muintir Na Tíre and models of community enterprise
  • The bottom up emergence of community activism in the 1980s- The Women’s Movement, anti-unemployment campaigning and the anti-drugs movements.
  • Irish Policy interventions – The Combat Poverty Agency and the Community Development Programme
  • Professionalism in the 1990s
  • The Centre of Effective Services and the submergence of practice into the Social Inclusion Programme

Theories of community development (50%)

Concepts of Power

  • Power and the self – cultivating self-awareness
  • Sources of power
  • Concepts of participatory democracy
  • Theoretical interpretations of power – (Marx, Gramsci, Weber, Foucault)
  • 3rd Way concepts and participatory democracy
  • The State and the political system

Pluralist approaches to community development

  • Community work and pluralist practice –Biddle & Biddle (1965), Twelvetrees (1991).
  • Corporatism and social partnership

Radical approaches to community development

  • Community development and the political left
  • Gramscian interpretations of civil society, hegemony and intellectualism
  • Freirean approaches to community work and community development

 The role of social capital in community development

  • Social capital and social networks  – Robert Putnam
  • Definitions, types and measurements
  • Bourdieu and the relationship between economic and cultural capital
  • Communitarianism as a model for practice

Concepts of  Active Citizenship 

  • Theories and definitions of Active Citizenship
  • The work of the Taskforce on Active Citizenship
  • Concepts of volunteerism and the role of volunteering in Ireland

Community development and social policy (20%)

  • Local government – structures, functions and relationship with the CVS.
  • White Paper on Framework for supporting Voluntary and Community Activity and developing the Relationship between the State and The Community and Voluntary Sector. (2000)
  • The Green Paper and White Paper on Adult and Community Education
  • National Social Partnership and the emergence of the Community Pillar
  • Additional key policy documents pertinent to CVS activity

Recap of module contents (5%)

  • Summary of modular contents
  • Discussion on key issues in community development theorie

Code: 6N14276
Stage: 2

Module objectives

The objectives of this module are to:

  • Describe frameworks for identifying community needs.
  • Offer an understanding of the correlation between theory and practice and encourage a critical reflection of this.
  • Introduce learners to the skills required for effective community work.

Module outcomes

  • Identify and demonstrate skills required for quality community work.
  • Participate in a research project drawing from relevant research paradigms and practice.
  • Comprehend and discuss theory practice divides in community development.
  • Analyse the structures and functions of a community organisation.

Module Curriculum

Skills for community work (35)

            Core knowledge base for community work as per Towards standards (2008).

  • Knowledge base to include governance and management, social policies and social theories, social and environmental sustainability, political, legal and economic systems
  • Skills base to include Communication skills – written and oral, interpersonal skills, negotiation and reflective practice, administration, including fundraising, financial and people management, strategic planning, monitoring and evaluation
  • Competencies base to include an awareness of the importance of integrity, personal awareness, empathy, dependability and respect

The relationship between theory and practice (60%)

  • Placement visits to a range of community development projects, Local Area Partnerships and other Community Organisations or networks
  • Examination of selected case-studies of community development in action
  • Attendance at a minimum of two conferences (to be agreed with tutor)

Recap on the modular contents (5%)

  • Summary of modular contents
  • Discussion on key issues in community development practic

Code: 6N14266
Stage: 2

Module objectives

The aim of this module is to:

  • Provide an overview of the planning legislation and mechanisms with the planning process
  • Provide learners with an introduction to the structures, procedures and rationale of the planning process.
  • Provide an overview of the planning system, from an international context, with emphasis on good practice examples from Europe.

Module outcomes

  • Understand the structures and relevant provisions of the Irish planning process.
  • Provide an overview of planning and design policy in Ireland and internationally.
  • Identify the impact of planning on the built environment and communities.

Module Curriculum

  • History and Development of Planning in Ireland (20%)
  • Planning in Ireland until the 1963 Consolidating Act,
  • International and EU Perspectives, Good Practice and Influence
  • The evolution of Irish planning legislation and case law 1965 – 2000
  • Planning and Development Acts 2000 – 2010
  • National, regional and local planning and development strategies including National Development Plans, National Spatial Strategy, Regional planning Guidelines, Local Area Plans etc.
  • Structures: An Bord Pleanala, NAMA, Local Authorities, Ministerial Powers
  • Enforcement
  • Irish planning legislation and policy (30%)
  • Planning for Sustainable Settlement (20%)
    • Population Density, settlement patterns and community dispersal
    • Zoning: Legislation and Infrastructure.
  • Planning and Conservation, including Directives (15%)
  • Built environment project planning: Feasibility and Development (15%)
  • Master Planning/ Strategic Development Zone

Code: 7N14280
Stage: 3

Module objectives

The objectives of this module are to:

  • Explain the core roles and functions of housing management.
  • Ground the concept of housing management within the Irish, UK and European experience.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the professional qualities and skills needed to work within different housing management settings.
  • Reflect on the role of residents within housing management.

Module outcomes

  • Compare and contrast national and international housing management approaches.
  • Assess a client centred approach, placing the resident at the centre of the management process.
  • Critically assess the roles and functions of housing management, contrasting public and private housing management practice.
  • Apply professional qualities and skills needed to work within different housing management settings.

Module Curriculum

Foundations of Housing Management (30%)

  • Identify housing management within the history of housing, and housing policy development.
  • Social approach (Octavia Hill) and contractual approach to housing management
  • Impact of Tenant Purchase Schemes, response to residualisation and the development of the Housing Management Groups (1996 & 1998)
  • A Plan for Social Housing 1991
  • Key Reforms: estate-based staff, decentralisation of services, tenant participation, increased spending, Housing (Misc. Provisions) Act 1997, anti-social behaviour officers.

Functions of Housing Management (40%)

  • Housing authority classification and assessment of social housing support need.
  • Housing management roles and functions: assessments and allocations, repairs and maintenance, voids management, rents assessment, collection, accounting and arrears control guidelines, asset management, customer service and management of difficult- to-let estates.
  • Assess the role of various public and private agencies working within housing management.
  • International comparisons of role and function of housing management sector.

Contemporary and Comparative Approaches to Housing Management (30%)

  • Examination of current management approaches within relevant agencies.
  • Relating regeneration initiatives to housing management approaches and functions.
  • Discussion of the reframing of housing management from managing stock, to managing people within community settings including current discourses on anti-social behaviour.
  • Resident experience of housing management, particularly within regeneration areas.
  • Reconceptualisation, Externalisation, Managerialisation (Norris and O’Connell 2010)
  • International analysis of good / best practice for housing management: including the Scottish example, NIHE in Northern Ireland and the Netherlands

Code: 7N14272
Stage: 3

Module objectives

The objectives of this module are to:

  • Introduce learners to social change and social movement theories.
  • Demonstrate the significance of social movements and social movement theory at critical points in history.
  • Present an interpretation of community development and community work within wider social movement theories.
  • Create an awareness of contemporary social movements, both nationally and internationally, exploring interplays with civil society and the state.

Module outcomes

  • Analyse and discuss sociological perspectives on social change and theories of social movements.
  • Compare and contrast key global social change movements in the past century including an analysis of their impacts.
  • Identify contemporary social movements and critique their effectiveness.
  • Critique the relationship between political institutional structures and contemporary issues and movements.

Module Curriculum

Introduction to social change (15%)

  • Theories of social change and social movements – functionalist perspectives, conflict theory perspectives, interpretive theories.
  • Reasons why people seek social change – (e.g. materialist, ideological)
  • Identity politics.

Social movement theory (20%)

  • What makes a social movement
  • Collective behaviour, collective identity, collective action
  • The life-cycle of protests and social movements
  • Social movements and democracy
  • Social networking and social movements
  • The media, culture and society

The labour movement (10%)

  • A history of the Labour movement
  • The labour movement and socialist movements
  • The legacy of “old” left Communism
  • Contemporary interpretations of trade unionism as a movement for change

Right wing social movements (10%)

  • Nationalism
  • Racism
  • The neo-liberal right.

New Social Movements (20%)

  • Civil rights and student movements of the 1960’s
  • The women’s movement – first wave and second wave feminism
  • Liberation theology as a movement for change
  • Environmental movements
  • Gay rights movements
  • Case studies (for example- revolution in the Middle East)
  • Other chosen NSMs

The movement of movements (20%)

  • Seattle and the birth of the anti-capitalist movement
  • The rise of the ‘occupy’ movement

Recap on curriculum (5%)

  • Recap on modular contents
  • Discussion on social movements toda

Code: 7N14271
Stage: 3

Module objectives

The objectives of this module are to:

  • Describe and critique the nature of quantitative research strategies.
  • Demonstrate quantitative data analysis strategies including data coding, interpretation and presentation of findings.
  • Examine theory, concepts, indicators, reliability and validity in quantitative research
  • Explore a number of quantitative research methods in detail.

Module outcomes

  • Define and critique the nature of quantitative research methodology including the epistemological and ontological underpinnings of this type of research.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of quantitative research methods.
  • Illustrate knowledge of quantitative data coding and analysis techniques.

Module Curriculum

The nature of quantitative research (30%)

  • Positivism and objectivism: Epistemological and ontological beliefs in quantitative research
  • Theory, concepts, indicators, reliability and validity in quantitative research
  • Sampling
  • Steps in quantitative research
  • Critique of quantitative analysis

Quantitative research methods (40%)

  • Survey research
  • Randomised Control Trials (RTCs)/experimental research
  • Structured observation
  • Content analysis
  • Secondary analysis and official statistics

Quantitative data analysis (30%)

  • Coding data for analysis
  • Analysing and interpreting data
  • Presentation of finding

Code: 7N14270
Stage: 3

Module objectives

The objectives of this module are to:

  • Explore the concepts of equality and inequality and distinguish between varying degrees and experiences of equality within Irish society.
  • Examine gender related issues to include discussion on concepts of feminism and masculinities.
  • Debate legislation on discrimination and inequality at National and International levels.
  • Examine structural inequalities in the education, health and employment sectors.

Module outcomes

  • Provide a framework for conceptualising equality and inequality within political and social systems.
  • Analyse inequality as it applies to various social groups in Irish society.
  • Critique inequalities in education, employment and health care.
  • Identify core policy and legal aspects relating to equality and inequality both nationally and internationally.
  • Critically reflect on their own relationship with equality and inequality including gender related.

Module Curriculum

Dimensions of equality (15%)

  • The idea of equality/inequality across the political spectrum
  • Basic equality
  • Types of equality (access, opportunity, outcome and condition)

 Class and economic inequality (15%)

  • Social class, the capitalist system, economic inequalities (micro and macro).
  • Conflict theories, functionalism, recap on Marx, Weber and Durkheim

Gender and equality (30%)

  • Gender relations and inequality
  • Concepts of masculinity and femininity
  • Impacts of inequality on women and men
  • Global inequalities on gender and development

Minorities, discrimination and diversity (15%)

  • Equality/inequality and race and ethnicity
  • Equality/inequality and ability/disability
  • Equality/inequality and sexuality

Structural Inequalities (25%)

Equality and Education

  • Equality problems in education
  • Pursuing equality of education
  • Cultural reproduction and the hidden curriculum

Equality and Housing

  • Equality of Access
  • Introduction to Rights Based Housing

Equality and Health

  • Social determinants of health
  • Equality problems in health
  • Pursuing equality of health

Critique of Equality Based Policy

  • Employment Equality Acts 1998 and 2004
  • Equal Status Act 2000
  • National Disability Authority Act 1999

Code: 7N14269
Stage: 3

Module objectives

The objectives of this module are to:

  • Review and evaluate core concepts of adult and community education.
  • Elucidate differing rationales for community education primarily vocational, personal and transformational learning.
  • Critically analyse the impacts of individualism, professionalisation and commodification on community education.
  • Demonstrate what is meant by community arts and explain ways it can be used. working with groups and communities

Module outcomes

  • Assess core philosophies and psychologies of adult and community education.
  • Explain variances between vocational, personal and transformational approaches to community education.
  • Critique community education’s relationship with wider models of higher and further education.
  • Define and explain what is meant by community arts.
  • Demonstrate ways in which community arts can be incorporated into group development and community development.

Module Curriculum

Community Education

Introduction to key philosophies of adult and community education (15%)

  • How adults learn (pedagogy and andragogy)
  • Transformative learning
  • Popular education and community activism
  • Mezirow, Gramsci, Freire, Dewey, Rogers, and their contributions to education.

Psychology of adult learning (15%)

  • Concepts of self-directed learning
  • Life-long learning
  • Psychoanalytic approaches to learning

Trends and issues in community education (25%)

  • The history of further education
  • The role of the VEC & FAS
  • Differences and similarities between community education/further education and higher education
  • EU perspectives on life-long learning strategies
  • The accreditation debate – a place for non-formal learning in community development work

Community Arts (40%)

  • What is community arts
  • Legislation, funding and supports for community arts schemes
  • How to work with community artists
  • Group development and community development through community arts

Recap on curriculum (5%)

  • Recap on modular contents

Discussion on contemporary issues and practice

Code: 7N14268
Stage: 3

Module objectives

This module encourages learners to make connections between development theory, global institutions and trade transfers, global inequalities, and social change.  Trends in globalisation, global risks (climate change, energy and resource consumption; debt, development, and military spend) and issues of sustainability and social change are examined – including a focus on how people-centred policies can facilitate sustainable development and social transformation.

Learners are invited to make the link, as global citizens, between how their professional decisions and consumption choices (e.g., energy use, product specification and sourcing) have both local and global impact.  Case-studies are examined to help illustrate this complex, interconnected and often contested nature of development and sustainability theory and practice.

Module outcomes

  • Have gained a broad understanding of historic and current development theories with reference to their socio- economic, political, ecological and social impacts.
  • Have gained or deepened their understanding of the global institutions and socio-economic systems which impact on daily life, locally and globally, and be able to analyse the value systems implicit therein.
  • Be able to analyse the connectedness between local and global experiences and processes
  • Be able to evaluate their personal and professional response (explored in housing and community contexts) to issues of development and sustainability and the impacts flowing from same locally and globally.

Module Curriculum

  • Theories of Development            (25%)
    • Key concepts and theories of Development – contested definitions and concepts.

Modernisation (Lerner)/ Dependency (Frank), People-centred development (Rahman).

  • What is development, measurement indices: beyond GDP
  • Impacts of climate change, and arms trading in the debt/development  debate.
  • MDGs: Millennium Development Goals and Beyond: gender and geography
  • Case-study: Trade/ aid:  Policy coherence for development.
  • Macro Economics – core concepts revisited(20%)
    • Supply/Demand theory and case-studies
    • Global financial system – Post WW II institutions: GATTO/WTO, IMF and the World Bank
    • Exchange systems: The role of fiscal, monetary, exchange rate, and income policies
    • ICT, global markets- currency and  commodities trading; FDI, MNCs, TNCs
    • Case-studies: Trade flows and impacts in global North & South development: 80:20.
  • Globalisation (15%)
    • Emergence- contested definitions, resource usage;  benefits and challenges
    • Underlying value system: who gains, who loses, who decides?
    • The Global Risk Society: ecological, financial, military/terrorist, biochemical, ICT

Geo-political repositioning /land-appropriation? (BRICS: Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa. Case studies: oil exploration – Niger Delta and Corrib Gas Line

  • Sustainable Development           (25%)
    • Sustainability: socio-economic, geo-political, environmental, human flourishing.
    • Whose paradigm? Neo-liberalism; Choices and consequences – local and global
    • Measurement indices:  GNP/GNI and /or HDI, MDGs, resource stewardship, human rights
    • Factors: Climate change, resource usage, debt/dev./military spend; new nation States gender, population growth, migration/urban :rural pull;)
    • Energy use/renewable sources (wind, wave, solar, biofuels or oil, coal, nuclear);
    •  eco-footprints; design specification and product sourcing (air miles/renewables)

Reflective practice: Review of personal and professional practice – how sustainable?

Personal & Professional Responses- how sustainable?  (15%)

  • Case Studies:Land use management: zoning and planning/human settlement patterns,
    • Housing design specification and product sourcing (carbon usage/eco-footprint)
    • Housing – local government and community responses (Ireland / Brazil / Kenya)
  • Case studies:  water/food – access to, protection of (Ireland and water-stressed lands)
    • Advocacy :-  ‘Act Local, think Global’, ‘The Power of One’;  Fairtrade

Code: 7N14267
Stage: 3

Module objectives

The objectives of this module are to:

  • Describe the multi-faceted nature of regeneration.
  • Identify the reasons for regeneration and review policy responses.
  • Examine the concept of sustainable communities, encompassing social, physical and economic elements.
  • Enable the learner to understand sustainable development theory and technologies.
  • Examine the development of green architecture and its impact on housing design.

Module outcomes

  1. Outline the reasons for, and characteristics of regeneration with regard to social, physical and economic elements.
  2. Assess the role of community participation in regeneration projects.
  3. Compare and contrast models of urban and rural regeneration.
  4. Provide an overview of sustainable development theory and technologies.
  5. Explain the concepts of sustainable communities, policy and approaches, from both a national and international perspective.

Module Curriculum

Regeneration

The Reasons for Regeneration: (10%)

–          Government policy and underlining values
–          Reasons for area/estate decline
–          Community activism and regeneration

Regeneration Projects (10%)

–          Sustainable regeneration: social, physical and economic factors
–          Analysis of urban and rural regeneration projects

Types and Models of Regeneration (10%)

–          State v’s Market-led models including Integrated Area Plans, Public Private Partnerships, etc.
–          EU and international approaches to regeneration
–          Community development and regeneration (St. Michael’s Estate case study)

Field Trips and Case Studies (30%)

Ballymun / Fatima Mansions / Dublin Docklands / Knocknaheeny / St Michael’s estate / O’Devaney Gardens / Limerick City Regeneration areas.

Sustainability

Sustainability and Sustainable development (10%)

–          What is meant by sustainability and sustainable development
–          Sustainable development policy in Ireland and the EU

Design for sustainable communities (20%)

–          Sustainable communities policy and approaches
–          National and international examples of sustainable communities

Critique of sustainable communities (10%)

–          What is meant by sustainable communities
–          Challenges of policy transfer

Code: 6N14286
Stage: 3

Module objectives

The aim of this module is to:

  • Enable learners to read, interpret and comprehend the key facets of social research.
  • Equip learners with the ability to describe and illustrate the role and nature of research in creating and developing knowledge
  • Develop learner knowledge of the research process, including different research designs and strategies
  • Explain the key issues and principal stages in evaluation research
  • Identify the relationship between research and evaluation, and the policy making process

Module outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the research process in creating knowledge.
  • Describe and explain the different approaches to research strategies, research designs, research methods including mixed methods, and data collection methods.
  • Develop the skills associated with common social research practice.
  • Outline the key stages in evaluation research and different evaluation designs.

Module Curriculum

Social Research (30%)

  • Introduction to Perspectives on Social Research (10%)

–          Positivism, interpretivism, modernism, etc.
–          Quantitative and qualitative methodologies
–          Linking social theory and social research

  • Values and Ethics in Social Research (10%)

–          Values in the research process
–          What is ethics and why are ethics important
–          Standards and principles of ethical social research

  • Research Design and Proposal 10%)

–          Types of research design (case study, comparative, longitudinal, mixed methods)
–          Elements of research proposal (topic, literature review, subjects, measurement and data-collection methods)

Introduction to Social Research Methods (50%)

  • Quantitative Research (20%)

–          Social surveys, design and analysis
–          Official statistics
–          Reasons for surveys and challenges of quantitative research
–          Sampling
–          Stages in constructing a survey
–          Analysis of questionnaires

  • Qualitative Research (20%)

–          Interviewing: structured, semi-structured and non-structured approaches
–          Focus groups
–          Documentary research
–          Common directions for interviewing practice
–          Analysis of interviews

  • Analysis of data (10%)

–          Gathering findings
–          Interpreting the data
–          Presentation of research findings

Introduction to Evaluation Research (20%)

  • Introduction to Evaluation (10%)

–          Reasons for evaluation
–          Practice and ethics
–          Types of evaluation research design (self-evaluation, external expert, experiments, quasi-experiments)

  • Stages in an Evaluation (10%)

–          Evaluation brief (understanding the programme, defining success and describing how to measure success)
–          Choosing evaluation design
–          Data collection and analysis

Programme Name: BACHELOR OF ARTS (HONOURS) IN HOUSING AND COMMUNITY STUDIES:
NFQ Level: 8
Type: Major

Code: 8N14292
Stage: 4

Module objectives

The aims of this module are:

  • To inculcate in learners the importance of strategy to the long term success of any organisation.
  • To equip learners to objectively evaluate and review relevant theories, concepts, frameworks, models, planning systems, policies, practices and key issues in the field of strategic management and as applied to both Public and Private organisations.
  • To develop the diagnostic and analytical skills of learners in the formulation, implementation and management, of strategy in organisations.
  • To develop an awareness of the strategic issues and challenges in the management of modern organisations.

Module outcomes

On completion of the module, learners will be able to:

  1. Assess the strategic position of organisations in a variety of environmental contexts.
  2. Critically evaluate the resulting strategic options and choices available to organisations.
  3. Synthesise and critically evaluate the effectiveness of organisational strategy, and assess the need for corrective action to address performance gaps.
  4. Recommend how organisations can go about implementing their strategic choices effectively and efficiently so as to generate the maximum degree of competitive advantage/added-value/effectiveness.
  5. Critically evaluate and redesign business structures and processes to support the implementation of organisational strategy.

Module Curriculum

1. Introduction to Strategy & Strategic Management (4%)

  • Key concepts, frameworks, models, and issues
  • External Opportunities and Threats
  • Internal Strengths & Weaknesses
  • Strategy in Different Contexts
  • How Strategy Develop

2. The Environment and Competitive Forces (12%)

  • PESTEL Analysis
  • Porter’s Diamond and Five Forces Models
  • Life-Cycle Analysis

3. Environmental Analysis: External Marketing and the Value of Goods and Services (12%)

  • Core concepts of External Marketing
  • 21st. Century Marketing
  • Market-oriented Strategic Planning
  • Analysis of Competitive Positioning
  • Factors influencing Marketing Strategy

4. Environmental Analysis: Internal Environment: Strategic Capability, Resources, & Competences (12%)

  • Definitions of Strategic Capability, Resources, & Competences
  • Tangible, Intangible & Human Resources
  • Core & Unique Competences
  • Efficiency & Effectiveness
  • Innovation & Knowledge Management

5. Stakeholders, Ethics, & Culture (12%)

  • Expectations & Purposes
  • Stakeholder Identification and Level of Influence
  • Core Values & Mission
  • Corporate Governance
  • Corporate Social Responsibility
  • Corporate Culture & the ‘Cultural Web

6. Business Level Strategy/ Corporate Level & International Strategy/ Directions & Methods of Development (12%)

  • Generating & Selecting Strategies
  • Types of competitive advantage
  • Bowman’s Strategy Clock
  • Sustaining Competitive Advantage
  • Collaboration
  • TOWS Matrix
  • Ansoff’s Matrix
  • Internal (Organic) versus External Growth
  • Joint Development Methods
  • Portfolio Analysis
  • BCG Matrix
  • Assessing the Viability of Strategy: Suitability, Acceptability, & Feasibility

7. Organisation Structure & Design (12%)

  • Defining Organisation Structure & Design
  • Determinants of Organisational Structure
  • Centralisation versus De-centralisation
  • Traditional Organisational Designs

8. Managing Resources (12%)

  • Managing People
  • Managing Information
  • Managing Finance
  • Managing Technology

9. Management of Change (12%)

  • Nature and importance of change
  • Diagnosing the change situation
  • Cultural Web and Forcefield analysis
  • Models of change, styles and role

Code: 8N14291
Stage: 4

Module objectives

The aim of this module is to:

  • Develop the interpersonal skills of the learner.
  • Allow the learner the opportunity to apply their learning to practical situations.
  • Build on the learner’s capacity for reflective learning and self-awareness in the work place.
  • Develop the learner’s professional skills.

Module outcomes

  1. Apply theoretical learning directly to practical work situations.
  2. Assess the impact of an organisation’s working practice on the client group or service user.
  3. Analyse the implication of critical reflection in a professional context.
  4. Utilise the concept of critical reflection to inform their own professional practice.
  5. Develop a high level of self-awareness and identify areas of strength and areas where they may need more guidance or experience.

Module Curriculum

Development of critical reflection/professional practice (15%)

  • Dewey (1916) Democracy and Education
  • Freire (1972 – 1996) Reflection in Education
  • Habermas ((1971, 1984) Reflective thought about political and social forces
  • Mezirow (1991) The Transformation of Perspective

Key theories underpinning reflective practice (15%)

  • Critical Incidence Analysis
  • Gibbs (1988) The Cycle of Reflection
  • Moon (2006) Free Writing

Reflective practice in the working/professional environment (15%)

  • Redmond (2004) professional openness and responsiveness, and client satisfaction
  • Redmond (2004) three areas to generate knowledge
    • Technical
    • Practical
    • Emancipatory

Becoming a reflective practitioner (15%)

  • Meaning making
  • Active learning
  • Change of Perspective
  • Dialogue

Learning Outcomes of Placement (20%)

  • Knowledge based skills
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Self-awareness skills
  • Professional and work-place skills

Supervision policy and practice (10%)

  • Respond! College supervision policy
  • Supervision practice
  • Accountability
  • Learning
  • Support

Volunteering policy (10%)

  • Concepts of volunteerism
  • Designing and implementing a volunteering policy
  • Organisational management of volunteer

Code: 8N14290
Stage: 4

Module objectives

The aims of this module are to:

  • Develop a set of analytical and interpersonal skills among learners which are necessary for conducting social research.
  • Enable learners to demonstrate independence, initiative and originality in planning and completing a research project over an extended period of time.
  • Analyse qualitative, quantitative and mixed method approaches to social research.
  • Encourage learners to be creatively receptive and responsive to new ideas and to develop towards their full academic potential.
  • Outline the ethical considerations when conducting research.

Module outcomes

  1. Demonstrate the capacity to complete a research project.
  2. Produce a proficient social research proposal.
  3. Engage in the process of compiling data for research, and delivering an analysis and critique of the findings.
  4. Apply ethical practice to social research.

Module Curriculum

Philosophies of social science (25%)

  • Epistemology, ontology and methodology
  • Research paradigms in social science
  • Considering your own theoretical and philosophical underpinnings for research
  • Qualitative v’s quantitative research

Social Research Revisited:

Research Ethics (10%)

  • Ethical considerations in undertaking research

Producing a Research Proposal (20%)

  • Rationale for conducting the research
  • Developing a research question(s) (hypothesis) and compiling a literature review
  • Research design

Research Methods (20%)

  • Approaches to data collection
  • Identification of appropriate research methods to answer your research question/s
  • Mixed methods research
  • Skills necessary for data collection
  • Ownership of data and research report

Analysis of Findings (25%)

  • Interpreting the data
  • Discussion of findings

Code: 8N14289
Stage: 4

Module objectives

The aim of this module is to:

  • Enable learners to appreciate the multi-disciplinary and complex nature of not-for-profit (NFP) organisational planning and evaluation.
  • Revisit leadership styles identifying features typical of leadership in not-for-profit, and for-profit organisations.
  • Familiarise learners with the responsibilities of governance and accountability in the NFP sector, including the resource demands of legislative and regulatory compliance.
  • Encourage a critical understanding of the governance and accountability challenges typical in the NFP sector.

Module outcomes

  1. Describe, compare and contrast the main characteristics of Not-for-Profit (NFP) and For-Profit (FP) sectors illustrating with examples of NFP organisations.
  2. Critique key elements of the legislative and regulatory and compliance frameworks within which NFPs operate (including voluntary codes of practice).
  3. Characterise and evaluate a range of leadership and management styles (and reflect on their personal and preferred leadership styles).
  4. Critique aspects of organisational and project planning, risk management and accountability for NFPs.

Module Curriculum

Part 1:

Organisational & Management Theory (5%).

  • Management within NFP organisations, NGOs and Community Groups
  • Leadership Styles:  Leader (born or made?)

Not-for-Profits (NFPs) (5%):

  • Definitions and characteristics of the NFP Sector
  • Convergence and divergence between for-profit and NFP organisations
  • Social entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility, social dividend/ tax write-offs.
  • Unique features

Governance Issues (20%)

  • Mission, purpose, origins, values, ethos, unique features
  • Legal organisational structure:  Company, Charity, Trust, Benevolent Society, other.
  • Board, CEO, staffing, volunteers, funders, role, review, renewal
  • Leadership and management; delegation and reporting; time management
  • Decision-making systems and styles (organisational theory and management)
  • Planning, strategies and modus operandi
  • HR: staffing and volunteers: selection, recruitment, retention, supports; legislation.
  • Communications and media strategy: identify one’s ‘publics’: internal, external; media; advocacy and networking and strategic alliances
  • Finances and funding mechanisms (diversification; sinking funds ; assets cash flow)
  • Risk management: organisational, sectorial, environmental, wider society (project specific; contingency and emergency planning; succession planning)
  • Appraisal, review and evaluation
  • Autonomy and accountability

Legislative and Regulatory Frameworks and Compliance (15%)

  • Compliance bodies
  • Appeals processes and Ombudsman
  • Codes of Good Practice (Professional, Sectoral: Voluntary/Regulatory-Compliance)
  • Charities Act 2009  /  Companies Acts / Employment Legislation
  • Health & Safety: workplace (and construction, if VHA)
  • Child Protection and Safeguarding  /  HIQA standards; HASSAP
  • Sectoral relevant legislation e.g., Departmental, HSE and HIQA
  • Data Protection and Freedom of Information
  • Appeals procedures and office of the Ombudsman
  • Voluntary Codes of Practice

PR, Communications and Advocacy (10%)

  • Identify one’s ‘publics’
  • Media strategy: what is the NGOs key message

Who needs to hear/see this? (to effect change)

Nominate PR person (available, time, competent on topic)

  • Advocacy: organisational, sectoral, networks and strategic alliances

Part 2:  Introduction to organisational and project planning

Organisational Planning (10%)

  • Environmental scanning: internal and external

–          External (wider socio-economic context)
–          Internal (vision, congruence with Mission and objects of company; need,
–          Resource viability (goal/resource match; timing, capacity of organization; sustainability)

Planning tools (10%) 

  • Problem statement, terms of reference and evaluation criteria
  • Research Ethics Statement and submission to Ethics Committee (in-house/external).
  • Stakeholder analysis
  • Scan of wider planning environment (including legislative and regulatory environment)
  • Literature review (including  relevant policy review – recent and upcoming)
  • SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis
  • PESP (now PESTEL) analysis:  Political, Economic, Social, Technical, Environmental and Legal
  • Logic Framework
  • Strategic Planning
  • Spider charts and organograms

Evaluation Frameworks and considerations (15%)

  • Vision and mission
  • Strategy congruent with mission, goals, resources, regulatory environment and outcomes
  • Ethics: research ethics; intended usage/ownership of the study/data/findings arising.
  • Feasibility, viability and sustainability reviews (resource/financial , timing and capacity)
  • Goal/outcome match
  • Cost-benefit analysis; need: service match? Efficiency, efficacy, equality outcomes
  • VFM: value for money; multiplier-effect (synchronicity); transferability/dissemination
  • Contractual agreement: refer tender specification and documents
  • Fairness principle: who gains, who loses, who decides
  • Serendipity, interest, energy and passion for the project (leader, advocate, champion)

Part lll:  Project Planning (10%) 

  • Terms of Reference.  Project rationale, stated goals, objectives, resources (inputs) outputs and outcomes sought.  Projected (un)intended consequences
  • Project review and evaluation criteria

Code: 8N14288
Stage: 4

Module objectives

The aim of this module is to:

  • Critique both national and international housing systems and markets.
  • Locate housing policy within the wider policy context.
  • Analyse the policy making process from a national and EU perspective.
  • Evaluate current housing policies, including emerging responses to specific issues such as homelessness, disability, congregated settings, older people etc.
  • Assess current housing policy from a human rights perspective.

Module outcomes

  • Appraise comparative systems of housing provision and analyse policy responses to housing issues in different social contexts, nationally and internationally.
  • Formulate a critique of Irish housing policy, from international comparisons.
  • Evaluate housing policies and strategies, with specific reference to the needs of particular groups in society.
  • Compare and contrast housing rights in Ireland and internationally.

Module Curriculum

International Housing Markets and Systems (20%)

  • Critique of housing policy responses:
    • Systems and markets
    • Subsystems and concepts
  • Sustainability of the Housing Market and System in Ireland

Recap the Policy Making Process and Analyses of Housing Policy (20%)

  • Irish and EU policy making processes
  • The hierarchical relationship between EU and Irish policies and legislation
  • Overview of housing policy developments nationally and internationally

A Rights-Based Approach (15%)

  • Human Rights in Practice
    • What do we mean by human rights?
    • Key concepts and principles
  • Housing as a right
    • Key instruments and commentaries
    • Application of Housing as a Human Right
  • Case study examples on housing rights issues in Ireland and internationally, particularly the UK

Recent Housing Policy Developments and Implications for the Sector (20%)

  • Housing Policy
    • Analyses of international housing policy, with a focus on Scottish Housing Policy
    • Critique the lack of a comprehensive housing policy in Ireland
  • Current housing law and policy in Ireland
    • Detailed recap on Housing (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 2009
    • Proposed uses for overhang of housing stock in Ireland
    • Housing Policy Statement 2011
    • The Multi-Units Development Act 2011
    • The Property Services (Regulations) Act 2011
    • Homelessness and Housing First
  • Its implications on the three main housing tenures in Ireland and their changing relationships
    • Social Housing Support
    • Social Housing Leasing Initiative
    • Mixed Tenure Estates
    • Incremental Purchase Scheme

Contemporary Issues of Housing Need (20%)

  • Analysis of the Housing Needs Assessment Regulations
  • Critique of national and international approaches to defining and assessing housing need
  • 2011 Working Group on De-congregated Settings and the National Housing Strategy for People with a Disability 2011 – 2016

 Overview of the Curriculum (5%)

  • Summary of the module
  • Recap the four housing modules